Last edited by Arashishakar
Sunday, July 26, 2020 | History

4 edition of The Elderly Coronary Patient found in the catalog.

The Elderly Coronary Patient

by Mauricio Wajngarten

  • 360 Want to read
  • 12 Currently reading

Published by Science Press Inc. .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Cardiovascular medicine,
  • Geriatric medicine,
  • Cardiology,
  • Gerontology,
  • Medical / Nursing

  • The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages72
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL12042321M
    ISBN 101858739438
    ISBN 109781858739434
    OCLC/WorldCa50215533

    However, elderly patients in the SHOCK registry (n= ≥75 years of age) who underwent early revascularization (n=44) had a >50% lower mortality rate than those who did not (n=) (relative risk, ; 95% CI, to ; P=). 77 This benefit to early revascularization in registry patients represents selection from among a critically.   The elderly are at highest risk of dying from COVID Age was a major factor in infection, hospitalization and death. The elderly — defined as .

    Each book features: • Title on front and spine in gold lettering for easy identification. • Heavy, tear-resistant paper and reinforced binding for durability. • Rounded-back binding so the book lays flat when open. • Reinforced corners for extended wear. Among elderly patients with ACS, BMI did not condition the survival or the risk of major cardiovascular and bleeding complications. The results were consistent across several patient risk categories. Impact of body mass index on clinical outcome among elderly patients with acute coronary syndrome treated with percutaneous coronary intervention.

      Octogenarians were less likely to undergo investigations during the hospitalization, with coronary angiography performed in only 17% of the elderly patients vs. 41% of the younger ones. 1 Octogenarians also had a higher prevalence of new-onset HF (45% vs. 35% in the younger patients.   Coronary heart disease (CHD) is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality in elderly patients (i.e., 65 years and older), translating into a substantial financial burden on the health.


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The Elderly Coronary Patient by Mauricio Wajngarten Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Elderly Coronary Patient Hardcover – January 1, by Mauricio Wajngarten (Author) › Visit Amazon's Mauricio Wajngarten Page. The Elderly Coronary Patient book all the books, read about the author, and more.

See search results for this author. Are you an author. Learn about Author Central. Mauricio Author: Mauricio Wajngarten. Management of the Patient in the Coronary Care Unit [Shishehbor DO MPH, Mehdi H., Wang MD, Thomas H., Askari MD, Arman T., Penn MD PhD, Marc S., Topol MD, Eric J.] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Management of the Patient in the Coronary 4/5(4). Purchase Caring for the Coronary Patient - 2nd Edition. Print Book & E-Book. ISBNBackground— Age is an important determinant of outcomes for patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS); however, community practice reveals a disproportionately lower use of cardiovascular medications and invasive treatment even among elderly patients with ACS who would stand to benefit.

Reasons include limited trial data to guide the care of older adults The Elderly Coronary Patient book uncertainty about benefits and Cited by: Coronary CT angiography with multiplanar reconstructions of the two described patients.

The coronaries of the year-old female are displayed in panels a (right coronary artery), b (left anterior descending coronary artery) and c (left circumflex coronary Cited by: 3. Age related functional changes Left ventricular systolic function. In patients carefully screened to exclude coronary artery disease and hypertension, there is little change in left ventricular systolic function with increasing age, although cardiac output may decrease in parallel with a reduction in lean body mass.1 w7 The determinants of cardiac output which may be influenced by age include.

This, coupled with state‐of‐the‐art catheter‐based interventions, mainly stent technology, have advanced the age at which patients present for coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) operations (fig 1 1). 1,2,3 The age group defined as “elderly” in the literature has gradually increased from ⩾65 years to ⩾80 years.

Heart disease is caused by atherosclerosis (ath-uh-roh-skluh-roh-sis), which is the buildup of fatty deposits, or plaques, in the walls of the coronary arteries over many years.

The coronary arteries surround the outside of the heart and supply blood nutrients and oxygen to the heart muscle. An elderly patient is brought to the Emergency Department by an ambulance due to a cardiac arrest suffered at home.

The ED physician provides critical care services to the patient for a total duration of two hours before the attending physician admits the patient to the Cardiac Care Unit. Age is an important prognostic factor in the outcome of acute coronary syndromes (ACS).

A large percentage of patients experiencing ACS are elderly (more than 75 years old), and they represent the fastest-growing segment of the population being treated in this setting. These patients present different patterns of response to pharmacotherapy. Of note, most of the trials have limited the number of elderly patients and women that participate in these studies.

With the aging process that has occurred in recent decades, the number of elderly patients with CAD has substantially increased.

Moreover, due to the greater severity of coronary damage and the higher global risk profile, CAD. Elderly patients with a history of coronary artery disease, cerebrovascular disease, or peripheral vascular disease are at high risk of disabling events.

Risk can be reduced by aggressive management of vascular risk factors (eg, hypertension, smoking, diabetes, obesity, atrial fibrillation, dyslipidemia). Background. Coronary artery disease (CAD) and acute coronary syndromes (ACS) are the leading cause of mortality in the UK, Europe and North America with consequent economic and social care implications [1, 2].In response, organisations for setting standards for high-quality care such as the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) have provided evidenced-based guidelines.

The technical feasibility of performing PCI in elderly patients has been questioned, especially because severe coronary calcification and tortuous vascular anatomy make coronary and vascular approaches difficult.

Elderly patients often have multiple comorbidities, including chronic kidney disease, which increases the risks associated with PCI. The challenges of age and ACS. Older patients have poorer outcomes than younger counterparts following an ACS. – This is related to a multitude of factors (table 1).Older age is a recognised risk factor not only for the development of CHD, but also highlighted in many ACS risk models to predict “short” and “long” term mortality, – such as the Global Registry of Acute Coronary.

Despite the high mortality rate in elderly patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), the value of coronary angiography (CA) in the elderly has been questioned due to a less favorable outcome.

The aim of the study was to determine the prognostic significance of CA on mortality of elderly patients AMI in “real world” practice. Background: Age is an important determinant of outcomes for patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS); however, community practice reveals a disproportionately lower use of cardiovascular medications and invasive treatment even among elderly patients with ACS who would stand to benefit.

Reasons include limited trial data to guide the care of older adults and uncertainty about benefits and. Objectives: We evaluated the clinical outcomes of elderly patients who underwent orbital atherectomy for the treatment of severe coronary artery calcification (CAC) prior to stenting.

Background: Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) of severe CAC is associated with worse clinical outcomes including death, myocardial infarction (MI), and target vessel revascularization (TVR).

The EWTOPIA 75 trial is a recent open-label blinded endpoint study of ezetimibe plus diet versus diet control alone in elderly moderate- and high-risk patients.

All subjects were Japanese men and women with mean age 81 years, an LDL-C > mg/dl and one or more major risk factors, and a history of stroke or peripheral vascular disease. Coronary artery disease accelerates heart failure progression, leading to poor prognosis and a substantial increase in morbidity and mortality.

This study was aimed to assess the impact of coronary artery disease on all-cause mortality, myocardial infarction (MI), and ischemic stroke (IS) among hospitalized newly-diagnosed heart failure (HF) patients with left ventricular systolic. Veerasamy M, Edwards R, Ford G, et al. Acute coronary syndrome among older patients: a review.

Cardiol Rev ; Grosmaitre P, Le Vavasseur O, Yachouh E, et al. Significance of atypical symptoms for the diagnosis and management of myocardial infarction in elderly patients admitted to emergency departments. Arch Cardiovasc Dis ;A previous report of the late survival rate of the elderly CABG patients ranged from 73% at 4 years, % at years,23 % at 5 years, to 66% at 5 years, although these studies were.

• In some patients with coronary artery disease, episodes of myocardial ischaemia can occur without symptoms; ‘silent ischaemia’ is more common in the elderly and in diabetics • Most patients describe angina as a pressure, a tightness, or a discomfort, rather than as a pain. The perception of angina varies between individuals, and.